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Aviation Justice Express tour 2011

Dan Glass in Toronto

Dan Glass, perhaps best known as the British climate activist who superglued himself to British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, has recently been catapulted back into the spotlight after being barred from speaking in the US by the Secret Service. But American aviation justice organizers’ loss was Canada’s gain, as he kicks off a parallel Canadian aviation and environmental justice tour.

Dan, a member of Plane Stupid and the Climate 9, was part of the successful campaign that shut down the planned third runway at London’s Heathrow airport. He spoke to a gathering of anti‑airport activists in Toronto on Thursday, including members of CommunityAIR and Land over Landings, on how local communities can learn from the UK’s immensely successful Heathrow in efforts to halt the expansion of Toronto Island Airport.

“We invited Dan to share with us the strategies that worked so well for the Heathrow campaign. The result: stronger ties, and renewed determination” said Brian Iler Chair of CommunityAIR. “The task of finding much more sustainable ways to live and travel is an urgent one in this rapidly warming world. The Island Airport in Toronto is exclusively devoted to short-haul flights – the worst emitters of greenhouse gases, and the most readily substituted with greener alternatives. Our work here on aviation issues is vastly enriched by the knowledge and experience our friends in the United Kingdom are so keen to share.” Was super‑glue training on the agenda last night? “No comment” said Iler.

This event marks the launch of Dan Glass’ tour of community and activist efforts across Canada. Along with US activist Holly Jones, Glass is focused on exploring, documenting and disseminating social and environmental justice efforts in Canada for British, American, and Canadian audiences. The tour will continue through Vancover, Edmonton and Athabasca.

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About Anirvan Chatterjee

Anirvan Chatterjee is a bibliophile, technologist, and climate activist from Berkeley, California.

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